Why The World Health Organisation (WHO) Has a Snake Symbol On Its Logo?

NdegePolycarp.

Photo Courtesy: World Health Organisation

The logo was adopted by the WHO in 1948 and has a staff and a snake coiled around it.

Many myths and theories have been formulated regarding the snake symbol found on the World Health Organisation with many people thinking it's associated with satanic cults all of which is gibberish.

Christians have also come up with their theory derived from the Bible about the story of Moses, God, and the Israelites. After the Israelites started complaining to God for leading them to the desert, God sent poisonous snakes that bite them until they ran to Moses asking for forgiveness from God through him.

God then instructed Moses to form a serpent snake and tie it up a rod so that when the Israelites are bitten they were to look up to it and get healed. Therefore the snake symbol on the rod signifies the snake serpent Moses was instructed to make by God symbolizing the power to heal.

Photo Courtesy: Kenya Medical Training College

According to Ancient Greek mythology, there existed Aesculapius son of Apollo who was perfect at healing and considered as the god of medicine and healing. The rod is referred to as the Rod of Aesculapius.

The snake represents life because it can shed its skin and reignite its health. A snake in pharmacology stands for medicine as its venom can be used as an antivenom or an antidote. That explains why every pharmaceutical institution has the symbol of a snake.

Photo Courtesy: Kenyatta National Hospital

NdegePolycarp. operanews-external@opera.com

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